Wireless Sector Boundaries

As the wireless telecommunications services industry has emerged, the FCC has created and adapted various geographic groupings to aid the awarding and analysis of wireless media licenses. These include MTA, BTA, and CMA Boundaries. GeoResults MTA, BTA, and CMA Boundary products combine current geographic updates to the original FCC boundary-group classifications.

MTA Boundaries

MTA-Boundaries
The FCC established Major Trading Areas (MTA) based on the Rand McNally 1992 Commercial Atlas and Marketing Guide. They are used to define the coverage of spectrum licensed for certain services. There are 48 MTA markets within the US.

GeoResults MTA Boundaries reflect changes in county organizations and borders.

Reference Data Includes
– MTA Code (Number)
– MTA Name

BTA Boundaries

BTA-Boundaries
The FCC adapted Basic Trading Areas (BTAs) from the Rand McNally 1992 Commercial Atlas and Marketing Guide. Like MTAs, BTAs are used to define the coverage of spectrum licensed for certain services. However, BTAs are a more distributed, localized version of MTAs. There are 487 BTAs that cover the US.

GeoResults BTA Boundaries represents changes in county organizations and borders.

Reference Data Includes
– BTA Code (Number)
– BTA Name

CMA Boundaries

CMA-Boundaries
Cellular Market Areas (CMAs) were created by the FCC to define the coverage areas for spectrum licenses in certain areas. CMAs represent a combination of Metropolitan Statistical Areas (MSAs)and Rural Service Areas (RSAs). There are 717 CMAs included within the US.

GeoResults CMA Boundaries represents current county organizations and borders.

Reference Data Includes
– CMA Code (Number)
– CMA Name
– RSA/MSA Sourcing